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Thank You from the Yes on CC Campaign

Win or lose, one last time from the bottom of our hearts: Thank you. We have a lot to be proud of. This campaign was hard-fought, with plenty of integrity, and a big dose of good humor. We built a winning coalition that will last long beyond this election to help make Colorado a better place. 

Regardless of the outcome, we picked the right fight, got to know each other (and ourselves!) a little better, and pulled together to push for better schools and roads.

It has been a pleasure.

With sincere appreciation and gratitude,

– The Prop CC Team

Invest in Colorado’s Roads & Bridges by Voting Yes on Proposition CC

This article was originally published in the Fall 2019 edition of the Colorado Public Works Journal.

Almost 30 years after narrowly enacting the most restrictive government spending limits in the country, Proposition CC asks Colorado voters to remove the arbitrary revenue limits which have severely limited our ability to invest in our students, our roads and bridges, and to address the needs of our fast-growing state.

Proposition CC was referred to the 2019 statewide ballot by the Legislature and, if passed, authorizes the state to annually keep and spend money collected above the current state limits.


Ballot Question:

“Without raising taxes and to better fund public schools, higher education, and roads, bridges, and transit, within a balanced budget, may the state keep and spend all the revenue it annually collects after June 30, 2019, but is not currently allowed to keep and spend under Colorado law, with an annual independent audit to show how the retained revenues are spent?”


Prop CC continues momentum to invest more in public services that has been building at the local level for years. The overwhelming majority of local governments and school districts have asked and received permission from voters to keep and spend money collected above constitutional limits. That includes:

  • 96% of School Districts (171 of 178 districts)
  • 84% of Counties (51 of 64 counties)
  • 80% of Municipalities (230 of 272 cities)

GOOD FOR EDUCATION.  Though Colorado regularly ranks among the top economies in the country (we are currently ranked No. 1 by US News & World Report), our investment in our K-12 public schools consistently ranks near the bottom.

GOOD FOR TRANSPORTATION.  Nearly 25% of public roads across Colorado are rated as being in “poor” condition and almost 500 bridges have been deemed “structurally deficient.”

GOOD FOR OUR ECONOMY.  Allowing the state to keep and spend revenue above current limits will stimulate more sustainable growth in our economy and help provide the critical services that enable all Coloradans to get ahead.

Join fellow Coloradans who support increased investment for Colorado.  Vote Yes on Proposition CC by November 5th!

Article Content Provided by Yes on Prop CC

Reducing Emissions in Concrete Production

Concrete is the universal building material – from pavements and bridges to buildings, water storage tanks, counter tops, and everything in between.  The manufacture and construction of building materials produces emissions, and concrete has recently been singled out.  The reality is that emissions from cement production make up less than 1.5% of the national total, and the concrete industry in the US has been actively working to reduce emissions for many years.

Note:  Cement emissions are included within the Industry category.

Major cement producers with plants in Colorado have reduced net emissions per ton of cementitious product by 21-25% since 1990 and are utilizing renewable energy sources for up to 26% of their power consumption.  In partnership with owners and specifiers, the concrete industry in Colorado is focused on providing an even higher quality product while reducing the impact on our environment.

Join our efforts in reducing emissions by following these recommendations:

Innovations

  • Use portland limestone cement (PLC), which incorporates up to 15% finely ground limestone during production, to reduce clinker factor and corresponding carbon footprint.
  • Optimize aggregate gradations to construct a more durable pavement with a reduced cement content and corresponding lower emissions impact.
  • Introduce recycled CO2 into new concrete through CO2

Reducing & Recycling

  • Eliminate minimum cement content and include performance specifications instead of prescriptive to specify properties related to increased durability.
  • Replace 20% or more of the cement with fly ash to improve concrete quality and beneficially dispose of a waste product.
  • Incorporate recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) into new concrete pavement to reduce mining, processing and transportation.

Longevity

  • Build long lasting pavements to extend the time between recycling pavement and reduce construction emissions caused by frequent rehabilitation cycles.
  • Diamond grind the surface of concrete pavement to restore smoothness and extend life without the need for additional raw materials.

For additional details about the concepts described and how they are being implemented in Colorado and around the country, please refer to the resources below or contact Angela Folkestad (afolkestad@pavement.com).

MIT’s Concrete Sustainability Hub:  cshub.mit.edu

National Concrete Pavement Technology Center:  cptechcenter.org

CO/WY ACPA Spring Updates

The Colorado/Wyoming Chapter of ACPA kicked off a busy spring on March 14th at the Annual Concrete Pavement Workshop. We work closely with our sponsors, exhibitors and industry partners to present on educational and innovative changes happening across the nation and here in Colorado and Wyoming.

This year the workshop and ACPA staff faced an additional challenge with a once in a generation “Bomb Cyclone” blizzard. As the storm approached, calls started coming in from speakers, who said their flight plans (including double- and triple-booked alternative flights) were being canceled.  Eventually, all but two out-of-state participants were grounded at home or at intermediate connection points. With the help of ACPA National staff, the out of state speakers were able to remote in and give virtual presentations.

The CO/WY ACPA staff are grateful for the flexibility of all the speakers in working through the schedule and format changes and for the persistence of workshop sponsors and exhibitors and all those who braved the storm to attend and make the 2019 Concrete Pavement Workshop a snowy success!

Concrete Day at the Capitol

On Tuesday, April 23, the CO/WY Chapter of ACPA was pleased to again partner with the Colorado Ready Mixed Concrete Association (CRMCA) and the Colorado Chapter of the American Concrete Pipe Association (ACPA) to host the 2019 Concrete Day at the Capitol.

The event took place on the southeast lawn of the Colorado State Capitol. Governor Jared Polis was in attendance to address the crowd of legislators, staff and members of the concrete industry. The message from the Governor focused on the recently signed budget allocating $300 million to transportation funding and to thank legislative staff for all their hard work during the 2019 session.

While the industry is excited to be taking steps toward funding, it is important we look ahead toward more long term, sustainable funding options as well. For more information on transportation funding be sure to follow the CO/WY ACPA on twitter (@cowyacpa) and Facebook (CO/WY Chapter – ACPA) as we promote the #FundTheFix social media campaign to raise public awareness and continue the conversation on funding Colorado’s transportation needs.

Thanks to all our members who came out to celebrate Concrete Day in Colorado!